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Results:
Date count run19 Mar 2021
Election rulesERS97 STV
Candidates running8
Available position1
Total ballots88
Valid votes88
Invalid votes0

Count

Round Almira Moosa William Jones Lakshaajeni Thevapalan Amelia Snook Maryam Imran Neha Deshpande Irene Karderinis RON (Re-Open Nominations) Exhausted Surplus Threshold
1 12.00 15.00 22.00 16.00 4.00 3.00 15.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 44.00
Count of first choices. The initial quota is 44.00. No candidates have surplus votes so candidates will be eliminated and their votes transferred for the next round.
2 13.00 18.00 22.00 16.00 15.00 4.00 0.00 42.00
All losing candidates are eliminated. Count after substage 1 of 1 of eliminating Maryam Imran, Neha Deshpande, and RON (Re-Open Nominations). Transferred votes with value 1.00. Since no candidate has been elected, the quota is reduced to 42.00. No candidates have surplus votes so candidates will be eliminated and their votes transferred for the next round.
3 19.00 24.00 18.00 18.00 9.00 0.00 39.50
All losing candidates are eliminated. Count after substage 1 of 1 of eliminating Almira Moosa. Transferred votes with value 1.00. Since no candidate has been elected, the quota is reduced to 39.50. No candidates have surplus votes so candidates will be eliminated and their votes transferred for the next round.
4 22.00 26.00 21.00 19.00 0.00 34.50
All losing candidates are eliminated. Candidates Amelia Snook and Irene Karderinis were tied when choosing candidates to eliminate. Candidate Irene Karderinis was chosen by breaking the tie at round 1. Count after substage 1 of 1 of eliminating Irene Karderinis. Transferred votes with value 1.00. Since no candidate has been elected, the quota is reduced to 34.50. No candidates have surplus votes so candidates will be eliminated and their votes transferred for the next round.
5 27.00 31.00 30.00 2.00 29.00
All losing candidates are eliminated. Count after substage 1 of 1 of eliminating Amelia Snook. Transferred votes with value 1.00. Since no candidate has been elected, the quota is reduced to 29.00. Candidate Lakshaajeni Thevapalan has reached the threshold and is elected.

Winner is Lakshaajeni Thevapalan.

Number of vacancies: 1

Candidates

Irene Karderinis
Hello, I’m Irene and I am running to be your next Welfare Officer.

Welfare is a topic that I am passionate about. Looking after yourself physically and mentally is so important and I have seen the impact that lockdown has had on individuals. As part of the RUMS subcommittee, I have given advice through our weekly RUMS bulletin, I have hosted welfare drop-in sessions and I am currently part of a team helping to create the content that is currently being posted on the RUMS welfare Instagram.

If I become the Welfare Officer, I would like to:
1. Organise a buddy Scheme, similar to RUMS mums and dads with the intention to match incoming 1st years and 2nd years with older medical students. This will add another layer of support in the community.
2. Initiate conversations about surgery and mental wellbeing. This can be accomplished by having more mental health centred talks and organising workshops.
3. Continue to utilise our social media pages.
4. Host fun events to help strengthen the surgical society community.

Mental wellbeing is important, and I would like to offer my skills, knowledge and expertise as the next Welfare Officer.
Lakshaajeni Thevapalan
Being a part of the UCL mental health society committee this year really opened my eyes to the impact mental health can have on students. Medical students, surgical trainees and surgeons are constantly stressed and under pressure from not only the workload but also having to maintain somewhat of a work-life balance.

As welfare officer, I would love to use the welfare grant to fund wellbeing and social events, such as, karaoke nights and yoga sessions. I would also like to host events with other societies, such as the Mental health society and Medics4Medics, to raise more awareness around the services that can provide help for medical students. Often, medical professionals can feel shameful when seeking help, but through this role, I want to help eliminate the stigma around reaching out during difficult times. Finally, I would like to set up a peer support service where students can just speak and vent to each other whenever they feel stressed or need some help.

As a third-year, I believe I can dedicate more time towards this role to really improve wellbeing not only within surgical society but across medical students.
Amelia Snook
As a medics4medics peer navigator for this year, I have learnt the variety of ways medical students can receive support for any problems they have and, since Surgical Society members are striving towards an intense but rewarding career involving lots of hard work, maintaining good mental health is of upmost importance. I am a good listener and want to be friendly face who can support others as much as possible and direct people who need more help.

If elected, I would contact surgeons and ask them about their experiences with mental health, perhaps holding group sessions where we discuss how to maintain welfare as a medical student and as a practicing doctor and surgeon. Receiving advice and opening up about our worries can really help to rationalise, deal with and alleviate stress so that we can work towards a healthy balance between self-care and striving towards the career we want. I’d love to involve as many members as possible in these conversations, as it could make it easier for everyone to reflect more on their thoughts and consider methods of self-care which will ultimately help with the end goal of becoming a surgeon.
Almira Moosa
Regardless of the specific specialty, stress is an inevitable part of any career in surgery, and I would love the opportunity to help my fellow budding surgeons to tackle it from the very beginnings of their surgical journeys right here in our society. Most importantly, I’d like to show them that they’re not alone, be it through any trouble-shooting, burnout, or even a global pandemic! As such, I’d like to implement a “Battling Burnout” video series, where medical students and surgeons can talk about their coping mechanisms and teamwork tips.

The Surgical Society has earned a reputation of being a “close-knit” group, and although this may have been challenged last year, my aim would be to uphold this wonderful reputation, and to build an environment where members of the committee and wider society feel a sense of belonging, and where they are comfortable enough to ask for support. To encourage this, I’d like to introduce more social events, for example a society games night. I believe my encouraging nature and willingness to help will make Welfare Wednesday your favourite day of the week!
Neha Deshpande
Hi everyone, hope you are all doing well! I’m Neha, a third year medic studying the Clinical Sciences iBSc.

It has been an incredibly trying year for us all: Freshers - you have coped very well with an unconventional start; Second years - the hard slog in front of screens is almost over; Third years - navigating research projects in these times has been a learning curve; Clinical years - your fortitude through this ordeal is truly inspiring.

However, the level of resilience in adjusting to the difficult circumstances has not come without struggle. This truth makes me passionate about welfare. I am committed to tend to the wellbeing of all by being an understanding and helpful point of contact and working my hardest to ensure every society and committee member feels supported, and mental health is addressed.

I have always enjoyed organising socials, whether it is within my iBSc cohort or reconnecting with my old secondary school friendship group. Bonding over a fun time is lovely for forging friendships and optimising communication within a team - I am aware how vital this is through my roles as Social secretary within the Jain and Indian societies at UCL. Through this experience I am also confident in my ability to support Surgical society to reach its full potential and deliver the best events.

I hope I have been convincing as a promising candidate and would really appreciate your vote. Thanks for reading and all the best for the rest of the year!
William Jones
Hi, I’m Will Jones, and I’m hoping to be your next Welfare Officer!

Everyone is aware of the impacts of wellbeing on people’s lives, especially over the past year. The life of a medical student also adds extra stress, and this is particularly heightened in perusing a renowned demanding career path in surgery. First of all, if I were to become your welfare officer, I would start an agony-aunt type section in the society’s weekly newsletter, with examples of concerns to help show everyone these are common problems, with written advice for these issues. Also, I would introduce a mixture of drop ins and talks to help facilitate discussion about welfare, to help support and signpost people for problems they are facing, and to highlight issues others have faced and how they overcame them. Finally, I would run welfare socials, not only remind people of the importance of a healthy work life balance, but also to further encourage members to form connections in the society, so you can help each other through your surgical journey.

I have a huge love for this society and the wonderful community here, and I hope that you will consider me for this position!
Maryam Imran
Starting medical school in these unusual times has taken quite a lot of getting used to and I’m sure this is the case for almost everyone. As a first-year medic, I can definitely second some of the experiences you may have been facing. I want to improve everyone’s welfare for the better through collaboration with academic reps, education officers and other societies. After all we are one big community.
The most important thing is appreciating that everyone’s ideas and opinions bring value to the table. I’ll be available to talk if you have any concerns that you want to discuss and will try my best to make sure that everyone has the best possible experience!
I think it would be super beneficial to organise more informal socials such as game nights (guess the surgical instrument? - suggestions will be appreciated!) to get to better know our fellow members especially at the beginning of the year. More advertising of the peer mentoring scheme should also happen as this is something I am sure will help everyone. This will increase the sense of community within the society and I think will lead to better engagement with the great opportunities on offer.